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Getting Started With ULORIC

Do you have gout? Help Lower Uric Acid Levels With ULORIC

If you’re like many people with gout, it may be time to put ULORIC to work for you. You may think you’re somehow to blame for your gout attacks, but the root cause of gout is actually high uric acid levels in the blood.

You aren’t the cause of your gout, but you can take steps to help lower high uric acid and manage your gout. Lowering uric acid levels to below 6 mg/dL is the goal for the
long-term management of gout. And, ULORIC was proven effective in helping achieve this goal.

In clinical studies, ULORIC 40 mg helped as many people, and ULORIC 80 mg helped up to twice as many people, reach a healthy uric acid level (less than 6 mg/dL) compared with allopurinol, another medicine that is often used to lower uric acid.

So, if you have gout, beginning ULORIC treatment to help lower your uric acid levels can be an important step in the right direction!

Learn about the differences ULORIC offers compared with allopurinol

How to Take ULORIC

ULORIC is a once-daily pill that you can take either with or without food. You can take it with antacids. So it should be easy to make taking ULORIC a part of your daily routine. . .maybe after you brush your teeth. It’s available in both 40 mg and 80 mg doses. Your healthcare professional will decide which dose is right for you. You just need to make sure to take ULORIC exactly as he or she instructs you to.

Your gout may flare up when you start taking ULORIC. If you have a flare while taking ULORIC, do not stop taking your medicine. Your healthcare professional may tell you to take other medicines to help prevent or manage gout flares during initial treatment.

Learn about the importance of continuing treatment with ULORIC.

Keeping Your Healthcare Professional in the Know

Before beginning ULORIC treatment, make sure you’ve told your healthcare professional about any medical problems you have. This is especially important if:

  • You have liver or kidney problems
  • You have a history of heart disease or stroke
  • You’re pregnant or planning to become pregnant
  • You’re breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed

ULORIC and Other Medications

There are certain types of medications that shouldn’t be taken with ULORIC.
These include:

  • Azathioprine
  • Mercaptopurine

You should also tell your healthcare professional about all the medicines you take, including prescription and nonprescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. ULORIC may affect the way other medicines work, and other medicines may affect how ULORIC works. Know the medicines you take. Keep a list of them and show it to your healthcare professional and pharmacist when you get a new medicine.

Where Should I Keep My ULORIC Pills?

First of all, be sure to keep ULORIC (and all medicines) out of the reach of children. Keep ULORIC out of the light, and make sure the temperature stays between 59ºF-86ºF (15ºC-30ºC).

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Use of ULORIC

ULORIC is a prescription medicine used to lower blood uric acid levels in adults with gout. ULORIC is not for the treatment of high uric acid without a history of gout.

Individual results may vary.

Important Safety Information

Do not take ULORIC if you are taking Azathioprine or Mercaptopurine.

Your gout may flare up when you start taking ULORIC; do not stop taking your ULORIC even if you have a flare. Your healthcare provider may give you other medicines to help prevent your gout flares.

A small number of heart attacks, strokes, and heart-related deaths were seen in clinical studies. It is not certain that ULORIC caused these events.

Tell your healthcare professional about liver or kidney problems or a history of heart disease or stroke.

Your healthcare professional may do blood tests to check your liver function while you are taking ULORIC.

The most common side effects of ULORIC are liver problems, nausea, gout flares, joint pain, and rash.

Please see the complete Prescribing Information and talk to your healthcare professional.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

ULORIC is a registered trademark of Teijin Limited registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and used under license by Takeda Pharmaceuticals America, Inc.
©2014 Takeda Pharmaceuticals U.S.A., Inc.

This site is intended for use by US residents only. 93192 02/14

 

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"I WISH I KNEW" Video Series

Video 2 Overlay Video I: Gout: Understanding the Root Cause
Video 3 Overlay Video II: Take Action to Help Get to Goal
Video 1 Overlay Video III: How ULORIC Can Help
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Use of ULORIC

ULORIC is a prescription medicine used to lower blood uric acid levels in adults with gout. ULORIC is not for the treatment of high uric acid without a history of gout.

Individual results may vary.

Important Safety Information

Do not take ULORIC if you are taking Azathioprine or Mercaptopurine.

Your gout may flare up when you start taking ULORIC; do not stop taking your ULORIC even if you have a flare. Your healthcare provider may give you other medicines to help prevent your gout flares.

A small number of heart attacks, strokes, and heart-related deaths were seen in clinical studies. It is not certain that ULORIC caused these events.

Tell your healthcare professional about liver or kidney problems or a history of heart disease or stroke.

Your healthcare professional may do blood tests to check your liver function while you are taking ULORIC.

The most common side effects of ULORIC are liver problems, nausea, gout flares, joint pain, and rash.

Please see the complete Prescribing Information and talk to your healthcare professional.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.