Foreign Language Material
Foreign Language Material

Safety & Side Effects

Understanding ULORIC—Safety & Side Effects

If you’re beginning treatment with ULORIC, it’s important to know that it has been studied extensively, in multiple clinical studies; more than 4000 patients with gout took part in them—some for more than 5 years. In fact, these studies comprised the largest clinical studies of gout patients ever. See how ULORIC measured up—review some of the findings from clinical studies.

Possible Side Effects

ULORIC may cause side effects in some people.  The most common side effects are:

  • Liver problems
  • Nausea
  • Gout flares
  • Joint pain
  • Rash

Your healthcare professional may do blood tests to check your liver function while you are taking ULORIC.

A small number of heart attacks, strokes and heart-related deaths were seen in clinical studies. It is not certain that ULORIC caused these events.

Tell your healthcare professional about liver or kidney problems or a history of heart disease or stroke.

Tell your healthcare professional if you develop a rash, have any side effect that bothers you, or that does not go away.

These are not all of the possible side effects of ULORIC.  For more information, ask your healthcare professional or download our Prescribing Information.

What If I Experience a Gout Flare While Taking ULORIC?

Gout may flare up when you start taking medicine (e.g., ULORIC, allopurinol, and probenecid) to lower your uric acid. This may be caused when crystals begin to dissolve in your joints as your uric acid level goes down. Your healthcare professional may tell you to take other medicines to help prevent or manage flares during initial treatment. If your healthcare professional gives you medicine to lower your uric acid, you should keep taking it, even between attacks.

To determine the right gout treatment plan for you, talk with your healthcare professional.

ULORIC and Other Medications

Be sure to tell your healthcare provider about any medications, vitamins, or nutritional supplements you’re taking. There are certain types of medications that shouldn’t be taken with ULORIC. These include:

  • Azathioprine
  • Mercaptopurine

If you have gout and you’re taking colchicine, naproxen, indomethacin, hydrochlorothiazide, or warfarin, your healthcare professional can still prescribe ULORIC along with these medicines without worrying about switching medicines or changing the dose.

What Dose Should I Take?

ULORIC is available in two doses: 40 mg or 80 mg once daily. Talk with your healthcare professional about which dose is right for you.

Patients with mild to moderate kidney or liver problems can take the same dose of ULORIC as anyone else.* Older patients can take the same doses, too.

*Only a small number of patients with severe kidney problems were studied with ULORIC. Patients with severe liver problems were not studied.

This information does not take the place of talking with your healthcare professional about your medical condition or your treatment.

Taking allopurinol? See how ULORIC differs Join Gout Smart. Sign up for goutsmart now and save up to $25 on every ULORIC prescription with our mone-saving PL+S Card. Don't Wait!  Sign up now & save

Use of ULORIC

ULORIC is a prescription medicine used to lower blood uric acid levels in adults with gout. ULORIC is not for the treatment of high uric acid without a history of gout.

Individual results may vary.

Important Safety Information

Do not take ULORIC if you are taking Azathioprine or Mercaptopurine.

Your gout may flare up when you start taking ULORIC; do not stop taking your ULORIC even if you have a flare. Your healthcare provider may give you other medicines to help prevent your gout flares.

A small number of heart attacks, strokes, and heart-related deaths were seen in clinical studies. It is not certain that ULORIC caused these events.

Tell your healthcare professional about liver or kidney problems or a history of heart disease or stroke.

Your healthcare professional may do blood tests to check your liver function while you are taking ULORIC.

The most common side effects of ULORIC are liver problems, nausea, gout flares, joint pain, and rash.

Please see the complete Prescribing Information and talk to your healthcare professional.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

ULORIC is a registered trademark of Teijin Limited registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and used under license by Takeda Pharmaceuticals America, Inc.
©2014 Takeda Pharmaceuticals U.S.A., Inc.

This site is intended for use by US residents only. 93192 02/14

 

Close

"I WISH I KNEW" Video Series

Video 2 Overlay Video I: Gout: Understanding the Root Cause
Video 3 Overlay Video II: Take Action to Help Get to Goal
Video 1 Overlay Video III: How ULORIC Can Help
Next: Play Next

Use of ULORIC

ULORIC is a prescription medicine used to lower blood uric acid levels in adults with gout. ULORIC is not for the treatment of high uric acid without a history of gout.

Individual results may vary.

Important Safety Information

Do not take ULORIC if you are taking Azathioprine or Mercaptopurine.

Your gout may flare up when you start taking ULORIC; do not stop taking your ULORIC even if you have a flare. Your healthcare provider may give you other medicines to help prevent your gout flares.

A small number of heart attacks, strokes, and heart-related deaths were seen in clinical studies. It is not certain that ULORIC caused these events.

Tell your healthcare professional about liver or kidney problems or a history of heart disease or stroke.

Your healthcare professional may do blood tests to check your liver function while you are taking ULORIC.

The most common side effects of ULORIC are liver problems, nausea, gout flares, joint pain, and rash.

Please see the complete Prescribing Information and talk to your healthcare professional.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.