Gout-Friendly Recipes

Eating healthy means carefully choosing the foods you eat. To help prevent triggering a gout attack, select foods with low purine content. Your body makes purines on its own, and they also come from certain things you eat and drink. Purines are broken down into uric acid, the root cause of gout.

While limiting alcohol and certain food is important, diet changes alone may not be enough to get rid of the buildup of uric acid. In fact, a low-purine diet lowers uric acid by about 1 mg/dL.

Enjoy these healthy favorite gout recipes—full of nutrients and low in purine content:

  • Add skinless chicken breasts for variety:

    • 2 pounds zucchini
    • 1 large onion, chopped
    • 1/3 cup raw long-grain rice
    • 1 can low-fat cream of mushroom soup
    • 2 beaten eggs
    • 2 tablespoons butter
    • 1 cup grated reduced-fat cheddar cheese

    Directions:

    1. Pre-heat oven to 350°
    2. Chop zucchini and onion into pieces
    3. Lightly sauté zucchini and onion
    4. While that is sautéing, add rice, soup, butter, and eggs into a big bowl
    5. Add to rice, soup, eggs, and butter
    6. Mix and pour into 2-quart casserole
    7. Top with grated cheese
    8. Bake 1 hour at 350°
    Print Recipe
    • 1 pound thin noodles
    • 1 cup grated, reduced-fat Parmesan cheese
    • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
    • 4 tablespoons finely chopped fresh coriander
    • 6 tablespoons olive oil
    • 3/4 teaspoon salt
    • 1/2 teaspoon pepper

    Directions:

    1. Cook noodles according to directions on package, drain, then place in a serving bowl
    2. While the noodles are cooking, chop fresh coriander and put in a bowl with the crushed garlic
    3. Thoroughly combine remaining ingredients, stir into the noodles, and serve while warm
    Print Recipe
    • 4 boneless chicken breasts
    • 1/2 cup of olive oil
    • 1/2 cup of balsamic vinegar
    • 1-2 cloves of crushed garlic

    Directions:

    1. In a large sealable bag, combine the olive oil, balsamic vinegar and crushed garlic
    2. Add the chicken, seal the bag and then refrigerate the chicken in the marinade for approximately 2-4 hours
    3. Grill or bake until the chicken is fully cooked
    4. Serve with your choice of steamed vegetables
    Print Recipe
    • 3-4 salmon fillets (no skin, about 1/2-inch thickness)
    • On each fillet:
    • 1/4 teaspoon of dill weed
    • 1/4 teaspoon of parsley
    • salt and pepper

    Directions:

    1. Season the salmon with parsley, salt, and pepper
    2. After spicing the fillets, place each fillet in its own foil tent so that it can steam appropriately, be sure to secure all ends so that the steam does not escape during cooking
    3. Place on the grill or in the oven at 350° for approximately 30 minutes
    4. Be careful of hot steam when opening the foil tent
    5. Fish should flake easily and be opaque to ensure doneness
    6. Serve with your choice of steamed vegetables
    Print Recipe
  • Cherry intake may be associated with a lower risk of gout attacks and low-fat or non-fat dairy products are low in purines. So, we teamed up cherries and low-fat yogurt and skim milk for this "gout-friendly" smoothie.

    • 1/2 cup frozen tart pitted cherries
    • 1/2 cup skim milk
    • 1/4 cup plain low-fat yogurt
    • 2 tablespoons fresh blueberries
    • 1 tablespoon cherry juice concentrate
    • 1 tablespoon honey
    • 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
    • 8 ice cubes

    Directions:

    1. Add all ingredients into a blender
    2. Blend until smooth
    3. Pour into two chilled glasses and top with dried cherries
    Print Recipe

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Important Safety Information for Uloric (febuxostat)

Do not take Uloric if you are taking azathioprine or mercaptopurine.

Uloric may cause serious side effects, including:

Gout Flares. Gout flares can happen when you first start taking Uloric. Your healthcare provider may give you other medicines to help prevent your gout flares.

Heart Problems. People who take Uloric can have serious heart problems including heart attacks, strokes and heart-related deaths. It is not known that Uloric caused these problems. Call your healthcare provider right away or get emergency medical help if you have any of the following symptoms: chest pain, shortness of breath, dizziness, numbness or weakness on one side of your body, trouble talking or headache.

Liver Problems. Liver problems can happen in people who take Uloric. Your healthcare provider may do blood tests to check how well your liver is working before and during your treatment with Uloric.

Severe Skin and Allergic Reactions. Serious skin and allergic reactions that may affect different parts of the body such as your liver, kidneys, heart or lungs, can happen in people who take Uloric. Call your healthcare provider right away or get emergency medical help if you have any of the following symptoms: rash, red and painful skin, severe skin blisters, peeling skin, sores around the lips, eyes or mouth, swollen face, lips, mouth, tongue or throat, or flu-like symptoms.

The most common side effects of Uloric include liver problems, nausea, gout flares, joint pain, and rash. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effect that bothers you, or that does not go away.

Use of Uloric

Uloric is a prescription medicine used to lower blood uric acid levels in adults with gout. Uloric is not for the treatment of high uric acid without a history of gout.

Individual results may vary.

Please see the complete Prescribing Information and talk to your healthcare professional.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA.
Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Important Safety Information for Uloric (febuxostat)

Do not take Uloric if you are taking azathioprine or mercaptopurine.

Uloric may cause serious side effects, including:

Gout Flares. Gout flares can happen when you first start taking Uloric. Your healthcare provider may give you other medicines to help prevent your gout flares.

Heart Problems. People who take Uloric can have serious heart problems including heart attacks, strokes and heart-related deaths. It is not known that Uloric caused these problems. Call your healthcare provider right away or get emergency medical help if you have any of the following symptoms: chest pain, shortness of breath, dizziness, numbness or weakness on one side of your body, trouble talking or headache.

Liver Problems. Liver problems can happen in people who take Uloric. Your healthcare provider may do blood tests to check how well your liver is working before and during your treatment with Uloric.

Severe Skin and Allergic Reactions. Serious skin and allergic reactions that may affect different parts of the body such as your liver, kidneys, heart or lungs, can happen in people who take Uloric. Call your healthcare provider right away or get emergency medical help if you have any of the following symptoms: rash, red and painful skin, severe skin blisters, peeling skin, sores around the lips, eyes or mouth, swollen face, lips, mouth, tongue or throat, or flu-like symptoms.

The most common side effects of Uloric include liver problems, nausea, gout flares, joint pain, and rash. Tell your healthcare provider if you have any side effect that bothers you, or that does not go away.

Use of Uloric

Uloric is a prescription medicine used to lower blood uric acid levels in adults with gout. Uloric is not for the treatment of high uric acid without a history of gout.

Individual results may vary.

Please see the complete Prescribing Information and talk to your healthcare professional.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA.
Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.